01-07-1996

SILVERCHAIR SPEAK OUT AGAINST PROPOSED MUSIC FUNDING CUTS

The three members of Silverchair have spoken out publicly against the Australian government's proposal to cut funds for youth television and radio programming, including the popular modern rock radio station Triple J .

Previously, silverchair have avoided public comment on anything other than their music. But according to a press release from John Watson Management provided to the innocent criminals pages, "the potential impact of these funding cuts meant that silverchair felt compelled to join the growing movement against this Federal Government initiative."

Triple J gave silverchair widespread exposure even before the band had secured a record contract. As Innocent Criminals, Chris Joannou, Ben Gillies and Daniel Johns won a competition in which one of the prizes was a session in Triple J's studios. The station played Tomorrow in heavy rotation, and the ensuing avalanche of positive listener reaction led to a recording contract with murmur and Sony.

"It it wasn't for Triple J and shows like Rage and now Recovery, we probably would still be just playing in the garage and struggling to get gigs," Gillies said in the press release, the complete text of which follows:

Silverchair Denounces Proposed Funding Cuts To ABC Youth Programming

Newcastle band silverchair have spoken out against proposed [Australian] Federal Government cuts to ABC youth programming.

Throughout their career the multi-platinum selling band has tried to keep a low media profile, generally avoiding public comment on anything other than their music. However, the potential impact of these funding cuts meant that silverchair felt compelled to join the growing movement against this Federal Government initiative.

Possible changes to the national youth broadcaster, Triple J, are of particular concern to the band as are proposed cutbacks to other important youth programming such as ABC TV programs Recovery and Rage.

"Triple J is the about the only place that most Australian kids can hear about things that matter to young people", said silverchair singer/guitarist, Daniel Johns.

"They play more new music than anyone else -- particularly by Australian bands," said the group's bass player, Chris Joannou. "It it wasn't for Triple J and shows like Rage and now Recovery, we probably would still be just playing in the garage and struggling to get gigs."

The band's drummer, Ben Gillies, added the following comment:

"Just because kids can't vote, the government probably thinks that it won't matter if they cut out things that are important to people our age. But I reckon the government should remember that people who are 16 or 17 at the moment will all be voting in a couple of years. If they cut things like Triple J then I don't think the government will be too popular with all these new voters."